Purchase Wildflower Tshirts and Other Products at our Cafepress Store

Come visit my store on CafePress!





The store sells wildflower tshirts, sweatshirts, and tote bags with beautiful pictures of native flowers. Buy one for yourself before you go on your next walk, or buy an unusually eye-catching gift for friends and family.

If you are a customer who takes a photo with a wildflower T-shirt purchased from our store and you send it to us, then we will feature you on our website! Here is Masako, a customer who sends us a picture from the top of Yosemite Falls in Yosemite. Masako is an avid hiker who enjoys wildflowers and Yosemite. She is wearing our Mimulus guttatus (Seap Monkeyflower) T-shirt.Our customer Masako wearing a Mimulus Guttatus (Seep Monkeyflower) T-shirt

See sample image below of Tiger Lily (Lilium pardalinum ssp. pitikinense) which is available on products from the Cafepress store.

Tiger Lily or Leopard Lily (Lilium pardalinum ssp. pitikinense)

California wildflower tshirt images currently available include:

Aquilegia pubescens (Sierra Columbine)
Brodiaea elegans (Elegant Brodiaea)
Calochortus albus (White Globe Lily)
Calochortus luteus (Yellow Mariposa Lily)
Calystegia subacaulis ssp. subacaulis (Shortstem Morning Glory)
Clarkia rubicunda (Farewell-to-Spring)
Clarkia unguiculata (Elegant Clarkia)
Delphinium hesperium (Western Larkspur)
Dudleya farinosa (Sea Lettuce)
Epipactis giganteum (Stream Orchid)
Layia platyglossa (Tidy Tips)
Lilium pardalinum ssp. pitikinense (Tiger Lily)
Lupinus microcarpus var densiflorus (Secund Lupine)
Mentzelia lindleyi (Blazing Star)
Mimulus guttatus (Seep Monkeyflower)
Thermopsis californica (False Lupine)
Triteleia hyacinthina (White Brodiaea)

More exciting images are in preparation and will be available shortly. Watch this page as we add more products, or just visit the Cafepress store and spend some pleasant time browsing the products available there.

To visit my store on CafePress, click here!

Gardening Gone Wild--Photo Contest!

It looks like once I have done something twice I cannot stop. I am actually enjoying this a lot so here is my entry to the October entry of Gardening Gone Wild's Picture This Photo Contest. The judge this month is Saxon Holt who got me started on this, so I am happy to send in an entry (almost at the last minute) to his ABUNDANT HARVEST theme. The picture below are two of our backyard pumpkins, just harvested and ready to carve up for Halloween. Maybe the kids will spare me some for a yummy pumpkin soup. The close-up juxtaposes the pumpkins with flowers from my Aloe 'Johnson's Hybrid" which are the same bright orange as the pumpkin.Pumpkins

Past Photo Contest Entries

Continuing with the trend I started last month, is it a trend if one has done it only two times, of sending in a link to a photo over to Gardening Gone Wild for their Picture This Photo Contest. The judge this month is Nan Ondra and her topic is Ornamental Grasses. I had a difficult time choosing my entry, but finally settled on a non-native, in fact, a down-right invasive grass from the Western hills of California, the Briza maxima or Rattlesnake grass. This grass was brought to California as an exotic ornamental to use in cultivated gardens and it has escaped into the wild and is causing some general havoc. This picture was taken at Ring Mountain in the Tiburon Peninsula, north of San Francisco and shows the rattlesnake-like seed-heads and a butterfly just off-focus to the side.

Rattlesnake


I decided to send an entry to the August Picture This--Get down on your knees photo contest over at Gardening Gone Wild. My entry is the California Snow Plant (Sarcodes sanguinea), which pushes it way out of the soil just as the snow melts, usually between 4000 and 8000 feet elevation in Pine forests. The plant is red and fleshy and lacks chlorophyll. It derives its nutrition from fungi in the soil. It is an unusual-looking plant that is surprisingly related to the likes of Madrone and Laurel. The photo was shot at knee level in a clearing by the highway, in full light, somewhat unusual in a Pine forest. Since the snow has just melted, other plants are also starting to put out new leaves.

Snow Plant (Sarcodes sanguinea) in conifer forests in California, Oregon, and Nevada






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